7 canning photos

Before You Begin Canning

(Use of commercial and trade names does not imply approval or constitute endorsement by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension. Nor is criticism implied of products not mentioned.)

If you have not canned for awhile or have never canned before — review before you begin:

Check the directions that come with your canner before starting to can. If you no longer have the directions or have questions about a specific canner, check with the company. 

Make sure your canning recipes following the latest guidelines. They should be based on or compatible with the 2009 guidelines. Depending on the type of food, ALL canning must now be canned in a boiling water canner (high acid foods) or a pressure canner (low acid foods). Significant changes were made in 1994 that are critical to the safety of some processes. These included changes in canning tomatoes, pickles, and meat processing. Also, other recipes were reviewed for safety and food quality and updated. In 2006 and again in 2009, canning guidelines were reviewed and revised.

 How to Use a Boiling Water Canner and/or Pressure Canner information from the National Center for Home Food Preservation.

  • Presto Pressure Canner Directions
    Download instruction books for specific models of Presto pressure canners from Presto's Web page. A toll-free phone number and an address are also given for contacting them.
  • Mirro Pressure Canners
    Mail, email and toll-free phone information for Mirro pressure canners (a part of Wearever.com website).

Boiling Water Canning Step-by-Step

Pressure Canning Step-by-Step

 

Questions or comments for the author of these videos? Email Nancy Urbanec, Extension Associate


Can safely by following the latest research-based recommendations:

Brush up on your canning techniques with the following materials:

University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension Canning Materials

  • Let's Preserve: Canning Basics UNL Extension EC (6 pg. brochure)
    Importance of using proper canning procedures, recommended equipment, including how to use pressure cookers, recommended processes and food safety issues. Questions or comments about this publication? Contact the author, Julie Albrecht, PhD, RD

National Center for Home Food Preservation (NCHFP) Materials

USDA Complete Guide to Home Canning, 2009 revision

The Penn State "Home Food Preservation Let's Preserve Series" Materials (2008 Update, compatible with USDA 2009 revisions to their home canning recommendations)

These 2 to 6 page flyers give basic directions for both freezing and canning for most products. They also provide a few commonly requested recipes.

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Canning Directions and Recipes for Specific Foods

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Important Altitude / Elevation Information

When canning foods, it is important to know your local altitude. Your altitude determines the amount of pressure (pressure canner) or time (boiling-water canner) for your food. In Nebraska, the altitude ranges in elevation from about 1,000 feet  to 5,000 feet above sea level.


Contacting Companies about Specific Products & Equipment

Toll-free Numbers,  Email, Websites

Questions about specific canners:

Questions about specific canning products:

Frequently Asked Canning Questions

General canning questions:

Pickles

Jams & Jellies

Jars & Containers

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Unsafe Canning Practices

botulism in canned pickled peppers

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Sources of Canning Supplies

(Use of commercial and trade names does not imply approval or constitute endorsement by the University of Nebraska-Lincoln Extension. Nor is criticism implied of products not mentioned.)

For further help in locating canning supplies, use your favorite online search engine or contact your local Extension Office.

Sources of ClearJel®

You must use ClearJel® and not Instant ClearJel®, ClearJel A® or any other form of ClearJel® when given in a canning recipe. Be sure you are getting cook-type ClearJel®. For more information, see the National Center for Home Food Preservation's 2005 article, "Purchasing and Using Clear Jel®."   Here are two frequently-mentioned sources of ClearJel®

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Canning with Splenda®

(Source: National Center for Home Food Preservation [NCHFP])

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Illustrations and Images of Canning Equipment & Procedures

National Food Safety Database Images:

National Center for Home Food Preservation Image Gallery: Equipment photos

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►Email contact for Home Food Preservatin webpages: Carol Larvick