Pork Cuts ID & Cooking Recommendations - Pork Belly

Pork Fresh Pork Side


Common Names: Chunk Side of Pork, Fresh Belly, Streak of Lean

Pork Fresh Pork Side
(Click on image to enlarge)

Description:

Cooking Recommendations: Cook in Liquid


Nutritional Information

 

Calories
kcal

Protein
g

Fat
g

Iron
mg

Saturated
Fat g

Cholesterol
mg

Raw

518

9.34

53.01

0.52

19.33

72

 

Pork Fresh Pork Side Sliced


Common Names: Sliced Side Pork

Pork Fresh Pork Side Sliced
(Click on image to enlarge)

Description: This is sliced from the pork fresh pork side. The picture shows one slice removed from the slab of bacon. "Bacon" usually refers to products smoked and cured, but not all smoked and cured products are called bacon.

Cooking Recommendations: Roast,Cook in Liquid

Pork Smoked Slab Bacon


Common Names:

Pork Smoked Slab Bacon
(Click on image to enlarge)

Description: The wholesale pork side is usually smoked and cured. It is usually sliced into strips referred to as bacon.

Cooking Recommendations: Broil, Roast, Panfry


Nutritional Information

  Calories
kcal
Protein
g
Fat
g
Iron
mg
Saturated
Fat g
Cholesterol
mg
Roasted or Panfried 109 5.79 9.36 0.31 3.31 16

Sliced Bacon


Common Names: None

Sliced Bacon
(Click on image to enlarge)

Description: Sliced bacon is sliced from slab bacon. It generally consists of 18-20 slices per pound. In this picture the bacon is shingled to improve attractiveness and ease with which slices may be seperated.

Cooking Recommendations: Broil, Roast, Panfry


Nutritional Information

  Calories
kcal
Protein
g
Fat
g
Iron
mg
Saturated
Fat g
Cholesterol
mg
Raw 556 8.66 57.54 0.60 21.26 67
Broiled 576 30.45 49.24 1.61 17.42 85

Cooking Terms

  • Braise — Braising is a technique done by browning the meat on all sides in a heavy utensil. A small amount of water is added and then the meat is cooked until tender at a low temperature.
  • Cooking in Liquid — Cooking in liquid is often used to prepare less tender cuts of meat. The meat is covered in liquid, (usually water) and is simmered until tender. The process may require several hours because of the lower temperatures.
  • Broil — Broiling is done in an oven or outdoor grill. The meat is cooked until it is browned on one side, then broiled on the other side until it reaches the desired doneness.
  • Panbroil — Panbroiling is similar to oven broiling, however it is faster and more convenient. A nonstick pan is used to cook the meat until brown on both sides with occasional turning. There is no need to add water or cover the meat.
  • Panfry — Panfrying only differs from panbroiling in that a small amount of fat is added first. Panfrying is used on ground, or thin slices of meat.
  • Roast — Roasting is recommended on large cuts of meat such as Rib Eye Roast. The meat is placed on a rack or in roasting pan and cooked until the desired level of doneness. Roasting temperature is usually set at 350-425° F.
  • Stirfrying — Stir-frying is similar to pan-frying with the exception that the meat is constantly stirred. It is done with high heat, using small or thin pieces of meat.