Meat Cuts ID & Cooking Recommendations - Brisket & Foreshank

Beef Brisket, Whole, Boneless


Beef Brisket Whole Boneless
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The Beef Brisket is a very course textured muscle. The heavy layer of fat and the sternum or breast bone have been removed. Due to the course texture of this muscle, cooking in liquid is recommended.

Cooking Recommendations: Braise, or Cook in Liquid


Nutritional Information

  Calories
kcal
Protein
g
Fat
g
Iron
mg
Saturated
Fat g
Cholesterol
mg
Raw
trimmed to 1/4 inch
312 16.90 26.50 1.60 10.69 73
Braised
trimmed to 1/4 inch
385 23.50 31.60 2.20 12.38 94
Braised
trimmed to 1/4 inch
291 26.80 19.50 2.50 7.53 93

 

Short Ribs


Short Ribs
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Short Ribs are small cubes containing a section of the rib bone and thin layers of muscles. The muscles of the chest perform considerable work and are therefore not very tender.

Cooking Recommendations: Braise, or Cook in Liquid
Nutritional Information

  Calories
kcal
Protein
g
Fat
g
Iron
mg
Saturated
Fat g
Cholesterol
mg
Raw
trimmed to 1/4 inch
388 14.40 36.20 1.60 15.76 76
Braised
trimmed to 1/4 inch
471 21.60 42.00 2.30 17.80 94

Beef Shank Cross Cut


Beef Shank Cross Cut
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The Beef Shank Cross Cut is identified by a cross section of the arm bone and many very small muscles, each surrounded by connective tissue.

Cooking Recommendations: Braise, or Cook in Liquid










 


Cooking Terms

  • Braise — Braising is a technique done by browning the meat on all sides in a heavy utensil. A small amount of water is added and then the meat is cooked until tender at a low temperature.
  • Cooking in Liquid — Cooking in liquid is often used to prepare less tender cuts of meat. The meat is covered in liquid, (usually water) and is simmered until tender. The process may require several hours because of the lower temperatures.
  • Broil — Broiling is done in an oven or outdoor grill. The meat is cooked until it is browned on one side, then broiled on the other side until it reaches the desired doneness.
  • Panbroil — Panbroiling is similar to oven broiling, however it is faster and more convenient. A nonstick pan is used to cook the meat until brown on both sides with occasional turning. There is no need to add water or cover the meat.
  • Panfry — Panfrying only differs from panbroiling in that a small amount of fat is added first. Panfrying is used on ground, or thin slices of meat.
  • Roast — Roasting is recommended on large cuts of meat such as Rib Eye Roast. The meat is placed on a rack or in roasting pan and cooked until the desired level of doneness. Roasting temperature is usually set at 350-425° F.
  • Stirfrying — Stir-frying is similar to pan-frying with the exception that the meat is constantly stirred. It is done with high heat, using small or thin pieces of meat.